Tuesday, May 21, 2019

PUPDATE: Mexican Wolf Pups' First Meaty Mouthfuls



The almost four-week-old Mexican gray wolf pups are eating solid food!

At 25 days old, the gradual process of weaning has begun. The pups’ menu has expanded to include small pieces of deer meat regurgitated by their parents and older siblings.

In between napping and eating, the pups are romping, playing, biting, and tackling one another. Beyond being great fun for the siblings, the pups are sharpening important skills, establishing a pecking order in the family hierarchy, and strengthening family bonds.

Follow the pups’ progress 24/7 via live webcams!

Saturday, May 18, 2019

Endangered Wolf Pups Snuggle on Big Sister's Back



Raising pups is a family affair; it is natural for all the wolves to pitch in.

With parents Trumpet and Lighhawk, the four three-week-olds born on April 26, and the three yearlings (Babs, Kral, and Jow Darling) born in 2018, Wolf Conservation Center webcam viewers have an opportunity to study the complex social structure of a multigenerational pack.

The yearlings will assist their parents in rearing their younger siblings by regurgitating food for them, playing with them, and even babysitting. Moreover, the parents will demonstrate critical parenting strategies and techniques for the yearlings to employ when they have pups of their own.

Passing down knowledge from one generation to the next also allows the family to maintain traditions unique to that pack.

Join the lovable Mexican gray wolf family now via live webcams!

Friday, May 17, 2019

Remembering Atka on his Birthday




Today is Endangered Species Day – a day offering opportunities for people of all ages to learn about the importance of protecting endangered species and everyday actions they can take to help protect them.

Today is also Atka’s birthday. He would have been 17 years old.

Although we miss Atka very much, his larger-than-life influence on the world persists. His legacy lives on in an empowered public who will continue the fight to safeguard his endangered kin.

Atka taught us that each of us can make a difference, and all of us ought to try.

Thank you, Atka. We’ll always love you.

Celebrate a Legend




Limited Edition Atka Apparel is Back by Popular Demand!

Celebrate Atka with your purchase of apparel from our limited edition ‘Guardian Spirit’ collection featuring a hand-drawn image of Atka himself by artist Jane Lee McCracken. Additional styles and colors available.

Proceeds will help us continue the fight to safeguard the wild legacy Atka leaves behind. 

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Mexican Gray Wolf Pup Born at Wolf Conservation Center Released to the Wild


One small step for an endangered pup, one giant leap for Mexican gray wolves.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

SOUTH SALEM, NY (May 15, 2018) -- Mother’s Day came early for a critically endangered Mexican gray wolf living at the Wolf Conservation Center (WCC), a non-profit environmental organization dedicated to wolf conservation. On April 26, Mexican gray wolf F1505 (affectionately named Trumpet) gave birth to a litter of five critically endangered pups.

Beyond being cute, the pups represent the WCC’s active participation in an effort to save a species from extinction.

The WCC is one of more than 50 institutions in the U.S. and Mexico participating in the Mexican Wolf Species Survival Plan a bi-national initiative whose primary purpose is to support the reestablishment of Mexican wolves in the wild through captive breeding, public education, and research.

Most wolves born in captivity spend their lives there, but unbeknownst to the largest of the litter, the female pup was destined for a wild future.

On May 9, the two-week-old pup was flown to Arizona and successfully placed in the den of the Saffel wild wolf pack, where the breeding female had recently given birth to her own litter. Cross-fostering is a coordinated event where captive-born pups are introduced into a similar-aged wild litter to be raised by surrogate parents.

According to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (USFWS) Initial Release and Translocation Proposal for 2019, Mexican gray wolves within the wild population are as related to one another as full siblings. This cross-foster recovery technique provides the opportunity to augment the population’s genetics.

Addressing genetic imperilment requires an active program of releasing wolves from the more genetically diverse captive population to mitigate further inbreeding. USFWS’s goal for 2019 is to foster up to 12 pups into the wild in New Mexico and Arizona, with the hope that they will eventually spread their genes to the greater population. 

WCC Curator Rebecca Bose and Paul Maus, DVM in Arizona

The WCC has been a critical partner in the Mexican Gray Wolf Recovery Program for nearly two decades. To date, three adult Mexican gray wolves from the center have been released in the wild. Participating in a cross-foster, however, is a historic first for the center.

“Trumpet’s pup is part of the critical effort to save her imperiled species,” said Maggie Howell, Executive Director of the WCC. “At just two pounds, she’s a North American superhero! She’s become a living, breathing part of the southwestern landscape, and her story will help raise awareness for Mexican gray wolves and the active efforts to save them.”

“The WCC is thrilled to be a part of this important recovery mission,” stated WCC Curator Rebecca Bose. “The collaboration among all who had a hand in delivering Trumpet’s pup to her wild family is a true testament to the dedication of everyone involved. In addition to USFWS, the Arizona Game and Fish Department and WCC veterinarian Paul Maus, DVM were key. We are especially appreciative of a generous friend of the center for providing his plane to transport the precious passenger from New York to Arizona!”

Trumpet and her pups are not on public exhibit, but sixteen live webcams, available on the WCC website, invite an unlimited number of viewers to enter the private lives of these elusive creatures.
Background

The Mexican gray wolf or “Lobo” is the most genetically distinct lineage of wolves in the Western Hemisphere, and one of the most endangered mammals in North America. By the mid-1980s, hunting, trapping, and poisoning caused the extinction of Mexican gray wolves in the wild, with only a handful remaining in captivity. In 1998, the wolves were reintroduced into the wild as part of a federal reintroduction program under the Endangered Species Act. Current estimates put the wild population at 131 in the United States.

PUPDATE: Two-week-old Mexican Wolf Pups Grow Bolder



The Wolf Conservation Center’s critically endangered Mexican gray wolf pups born on April 26 are almost three weeks old! This is a significant milestone for the pocket-size predators.

Born blind and deaf with their eyes and ears closed, wolf pups rely solely on their sense of smell and the feel of their surroundings to navigate for their first couple of weeks. Their eyes (blue in color for now) began to open at 10 – 12 days old and their ears should open up soon. Generally, pups begin to hear at about 21 days old and their ears will begin to stand up too!

As the pups continue to practice walking, they’ll grow bolder and begin appearing outside of the den more and more!

Monitor their development by joining the critically endangered kiddos via live webcams!

Background

Beyond being cute, these pups represent the Wolf Conservation Center’s active participation in an effort to save a species from extinction.

The WCC is one of more than 50 institutions in the U.S. and Mexico participating in the Mexican Wolf Species Survival Plan – a bi-national initiative whose primary purpose is to support the reestablishment of Mexican wolves in the wild through captive breeding, public education, and research.

The Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) or “lobo” is the most genetically distinct lineage of wolves in the Western Hemisphere, and one of the most endangered mammals in North America. By the mid-1980s, hunting, trapping, and poisoning caused the extinction of lobos in the wild, with only seven remaining rescued from extinction in captivity. In 1998, the wolves were reintroduced into the wild as part of a federal reintroduction program under the Endangered Species Act. Today in the U.S., there is a single wild population comprising only 131 individuals – an increase from 114 counted at the end of 2017.

Sunday, May 12, 2019

Mother’s Day Surprise – Rare Mexican Gray Wolf Pups Born at the Wolf Conservation Center

Elusive. Endangered. Extremely Cute.

Rare Mexican Gray Wolf Pups Born at the WCC!

Mother’s day came early for Mexican gray wolf Trumpet! On April 26, the mother of three gave birth to her second litter! Beyond being adorable, the pups represent the Wolf Conservation Center’s active participation in the effort to save a species on the brink of extinction.


The Mexican gray wolf or “Lobo” is the most genetically distinct lineage of wolves in the Western Hemisphere, and one of the most endangered mammals in North America. By the mid-1980s, hunting, trapping, and poisoning caused the extinction of Mexican gray wolves in the wild, with only a handful remaining in captivity. In 1998, the wolves were reintroduced into the wild as part of a federal reintroduction program under the Endangered Species Act. Current estimates put the wild population at 131 in the United States.

To watch the family’s progress, tune in to their live webcams.

Wednesday, May 8, 2019

Teeny Tiniest Wolf We’ve Ever Known Turns One!


Happy first birthday to the teeny tiniest wolf we’ve ever known!

Born on May 8, 2018 to Mexican gray wolves Rosa and Alléno, Craighead and his eight siblings (who were all named for fabulous female conservationists ) quickly stole the hearts of wolf supporters worldwide with their spunky personalities – and drastic size differences! As the runts of the litter, Craighead and his sister Diane proved that weight is simply a number; it’s the attitude that matters!

Beyond being cute, Craighead and his siblings (Diane, Bria, Hélène, Carson, Beattie, Mittermeier, Lek, and Goodall) represent the Wolf Conservation Center’s active participation in the effort to save their critically endangered species from extinction. 


Join them now via LIVE webcam and share some birthday love!

Note: We’re quite proud of Diane, Bria, Hélène, Carson, Beattie, Mittermeier, Lek, and Goodall, but Craighead’s growth is simply too adorable not to document!