Thursday, December 7, 2017

Axl Rose Throws Himself to the Wolves

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Join Axl Rose and fight the war on wolves!

The “War on Wolves” budget rider seeks to strip Endangered Species Act (ESA) protections from wolves in four states. If passed into law, these wolves will die at the hands of TROPHY hunters.

Take Action Today


The toxic provision proposes to permanently remove federal Endangered Species Act (ESA) protections for gray wolves in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Wyoming, to allow trophy hunting and trapping of wolves to resume. To add insult to injury, the rider prohibits its judicial review, thus preventing any legal challenge.

Judicial review is an important part of the checks and balances to limit the authority of the legislative branch. Wolves are on the table today. What tomorrow? Our environment? Our public health? Our civil rights? Would your Senator support a bill that undermines one of the central pillars of American democracy?

Lawmakers have repeatedly inserted this anti-wolf/anti-ESA provision into unrelated must-pass spending bills. ENOUGH IS ENOUGH.


Please urge your representatives to ensure that anti-wolf riders, which undermine the ESA and its scientific process, are NOT included in the must-pass budget bill. Take action here.

Photo: Katarina Benzova Photography

Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Giving Tuesday All Month Long!

The Wolf Conservation Center was so lucky to receive amazing support from our followers this past Giving Tuesday, and we're so fortunate that your generosity extends throughout the year. We think Giving Tuesday should be every Tuesday! So this holiday season, we'll highlight some of our favorite organizations in an attempt to raise awareness of their amazing work. Join us for an extended #GivingTuesday and give all season long!

Susie's Senior Dogs is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization working to bring awareness to the plight of homeless senior dogs. Senior dogs, like wolves, are often misunderstood and as such, senior dogs are typically overlooked during the adoption process. If you're able, please help us support their mission of finding homes for senior dogs.

Perhaps you can even adopt one?

Sunday, December 3, 2017

New Paper On Eastern Coyotes of Long Island, New York

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Coyotes (Canis latrans) have increased their range dramatically over the past century. Formerly restricted to western North America, they now roam across the continent, in many habitats including large cities.

Even New York City (NYC), one of the largest and most densely populated urban centers in the world, has been colonized by coyotes. And now the last hold out, Long Island, N has a few coyotes too. Given the history of coyote success, it's expected that coyotes will establish a growing population there in the near future.

There is no evidence from prehistory or recent history that coyotes ever populated Long Island, so this appears to be truly a novel colonization. However, they do fulfill an important ecological role, similar to the role of other carnivores humans have exterminated from the eastern US.

In a new paper, scientists summarize all verified accounts of coyotes on Long Island, including the first record of breeding.

Saturday, December 2, 2017

Growing Threats to Arctic Wolf Habitat

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Last night, the Senate voted to approve its tax reform bill containing a highly controversial provision opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) to oil and gas drilling.

A majority of American voters want the Refuge to remain protected. Scientists say drilling will destroy this vital habitat for wolves, polar bears, and caribou.

Less than a month ago 37 leading Arctic wildlife scientists sent a letter opposing drilling on the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

Decades of biological study and scientific research within the Arctic Refuge have confirmed that the coastal plain specifically is vital to the biological diversity of the entire refuge. Within the narrow (15-40 miles) coastal plain, there is a unique compression of habitats which concentrates a wide array of wildlife native to the Arctic, including polar bears, grizzly bears, and WOLVES.

In fact, according to the USFWS, the Arctic Refuge coastal plain contains the greatest wildlife diversity of any protected area above the Arctic Circle.

Friday, December 1, 2017

Where Did Black Wolves Come From?

zephyr_fall_logo_smDid you know that the black fur of some North American wolves is the result of long-ago dalliances with domestic dogs? Wolves are believed to have picked up the black-coat mutation some 12,000-15,000 years ago. The black-fur mutation established itself very quickly in forest-dwelling wolves which suggests it must provide them with some significant advantage. Read more here via The New York Times

Thursday, November 30, 2017

You heard our howls - thank you!

Thank You

You did it! Two days ago, the Wolf Conservation Center invited you to be a part of Giving Tuesday and you heard our howls! Nearly 700 supporters helped the WCC raise over $60,000 on Tuesday to meet our matching grant of $30,000! We are humbled by your support and incredibly grateful for having friends like you.

Thanks again for your encouragement and your commitment to wolves, ecosystem education, species preservation, and environmental advocacy!

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Trump Administration Finalizes Deeply Flawed Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan





For Immediate Release, November 29, 2017

Contacts:
Michael Robinson, (575) 313-7017, michaelr@biologicaldiversity.org
Bryan Bird, (505) 395-7332, bbird@defenders.org
Hailey Hawkins, (662) 251-5804, hhawkins@endangered.org
Greta Anderson (520) 623-1878, greta@westernwatersheds.org
Emily Renn, (928) 202-1325, emily@gcwolfrecovery.org
Christopher Smith, (505) 395-6177, csmith@wildearthguardians.org
Sandy Bahr, (602) 999-5790, sandy.bahr@sierraclub.org
Maggie Howell, (914) 763-2373, maggie@nywolf.org
Kim Crumbo, (928) 606-5850, crumbo@wildlandsnetwork.org
Dave Parsons, (505) 908-0468, ellobodave@comcast.net

Trump Administration Finalizes Deeply Flawed Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan

Plan Ignores Science, Sharply Limits Recovery


SILVER CITY, N.M.— The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service finalized a deeply flawed recovery plan for the Mexican gray wolf today that will prevent the species from thriving in its historic homelands.

Responding to objections from state officials, the plan limits recovery efforts to south of Interstate 40, cutting wolves off from key habitat in and around Grand Canyon National Park and the southern Rocky Mountains of New Mexico. The plan also sets population targets of just 320 wolves in the United States and 200 in Mexico to remove protections — well below what federal scientists have determined are needed for Mexican gray wolves to be considered stable. And the isolation of the two populations would fail to address inbreeding that reduces the wolves’ viability.

“This isn’t a recovery plan, it’s a blueprint for disaster for Mexican gray wolves,” said Michael Robinson, a conservation advocate at the Center for Biological Diversity. “By limiting their habitat and stripping protections too soon, this plan ignores the science and ensures Mexican wolves never reach sufficient numbers to be secure.”

In 2011 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service appointed scientists to a recovery team that drafted a recovery plan. That plan called for three interconnected populations with a total of 750 animals. It identified the Grand Canyon and northern New Mexico as the best places for establishing two more populations. Largely because officials from Utah and Colorado did not want wolves close to their borders, the Fish and Wildlife Service never finalized the plan and has let the recovery team languish. The Service’s plan released today was written with little to no input from scientists on the recovery team.

“Once again, politics trump science,” said Bryan Bird, Defenders of Wildlife’s Southwest program director. “The final recovery plan fails the Mexican gray wolf with inbreeding, dangerously low populations, insufficient range and intense trapping and shooting. Mexican gray wolves are not receiving the science-based plan they desperately needed to survive.”

“Americans want a strong, science-based recovery plan,” said Hailey Hawkins of the Endangered Species Coalition. “Of the 100,000 comments submitted to US Fish and Wildlife Service on the Draft Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan, more than 99 percent of them were in support of wolf recovery. This recovery plan should address the concerns of the public – dangerously low recovery numbers, habitat fragmentation, poaching, declining genetic diversity and a potentially disastrous border wall – not ignore them."

“The plan also precludes recovery of wolves in regions that independent scientists and the Fish and Wildlife Service’s own Mexican Wolf Recovery Team’s scientific subgroup say are essential to the wolves’ long-term survival,” said Kim Crumbo, western conservation director for Wildlands Network. “Recovery zones in the Grand Canyon and southern Rocky Mountains in northern Arizona and New Mexico, along with southern Utah and Colorado, are essential for lobo survival.”

“Beyond shortchanging the wolves, the plan's limited geographic scope also prevents people throughout much of the region from enjoying the esthetic, ecological, educational, historical, recreational and scientific benefits that would accompany meaningful recovery,” said Emily Renn of the Grand Canyon Wolf Recovery Project. “These are the values that the Endangered Species Act is intended to protect.”

“Western public lands need the balance that wolves can bring,” said Greta Anderson, deputy director of Western Watersheds Project. “We know what wolves need to survive and thrive, but this plan falls far short of ensuring that outcome.”

“The plan reads like something that wolves’ most virulent opponents would have written in their wildest dreams,” said Christopher Smith, Southern Rockies wildlife advocate for WildEarth Guardians. “Clearly, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is catering to a very narrow set of interests that want to see this amazing species banished from their native Southwestern home.”

"The Service is granting the very state agencies that have gone to extraordinary lengths to obstruct recovery, too much authority over the time, location, and circumstances of wolf releases by requiring that releases comply with state permits,” said Maggie Howell of the Wolf Conservation Center. “Too many opportunities, and quite frankly genetically irreplaceable wolves, have already been wasted under the states’ mismanagement — critically endangered lobos deserve better.”

“It is disappointing that the agency charged with recovery of these critically endangered animals — the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service — has abandoned science and its mission to appease the narrow interests of the state game agencies,” said Sandy Bahr, chapter director of Sierra Club’s Grand Canyon (Arizona) Chapter. “We must expect, we must demand better for wolves and all of our wildlife.”

“The northern boundary to the Mexican wolf recovery area, arbitrarily held at I-40 in this plan, literally cements in place yet another politically driven obstacle to our lobos’ survival in the Southwest, which depends on their ability to move freely for genetic health and climate resilience,” said Kelly Burke, executive director of Grand Canyon Wildlands.

“The Fish and Wildlife Service published over 250 pages of supporting ‘scientific’ justification, used a sophisticated model to predict extinction probabilities, then tossed the science aside and asked the states how many wolves they would tolerate with no scientific justification whatsoever,” said David Parsons, former Mexican wolf recovery coordinator for the Fish and Wildlife Service. “Using the states’ arbitrary upper limit as a population cap in the population viability model and forcing additional recovery needs to Mexico, the plan will guarantee that from now to eternity no more than a running average of 325 Mexican wolves will ever be allowed to exist in the entire U.S. Southwest. This plan is a disgraceful sham.”


Background

At last count 113 Mexican gray wolves live in Arizona and New Mexico and approximately 30 to 35 wolves live in Mexico. A new census of the wolves in the southwestern United States will begin next month.


The wolves’ U.S. population is genetically impoverished, with wolves as related to each other, on average, as are siblings in a normal population. That's due to the small founding population of just seven wolves that were captured and bred in captivity after passage of the Endangered Species Act in 1973 and mismanagement after reintroduction on behalf of the livestock industry. That included government trapping and shooting of genetically rare wolves and infrequent releases of less closely-related wolves from captivity into the wild.


The new recovery plan uses faulty information and otherwise misconstrues data to suggest that just 320 wolves in an isolated population could represent a genetic rebound and official recovery from this dangerous and deteriorating situation.

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The Center for Biological Diversity is a national, nonprofit conservation organization with more than 1.5 million members and online activists dedicated to the protection of endangered species and wild places.


Western Watersheds Project is a nonprofit conservation organization that seeks to restore western watersheds for wildlife.


The Grand Canyon Wolf Recovery Project is a nonprofit organization dedicated to bringing back wolves to help restore ecological health in the Grand Canyon region.

The mission of Wildlands Network is to reconnect, restore, and rewild North America so that life in all its diversity can thrive.

WildEarth Guardians is a nonprofit conservation organization working to protect and restore the wildlife, wild places, wild rivers and health of the American West. 


Founded in 1892, the Sierra Club is a national nonprofit environmental organization with approximately 2.7 million members and supporters, including more than 60,000 in Arizona. Sierra Club’s mission is “to explore, enjoy, and protect the wild places of the earth; to practice and promote the responsible use of the earth’s ecosystems and resources; and to educate and enlist humanity to protect and restore the quality of the natural and human environment.”


The Wolf Conservation Center is an environmental education organization committed to conserving wolf populations in North America through science-based education programming and participation in the federal Species Survival Plans for the critically endangered Mexican gray wolf and red wolf.


Defenders of Wildlife is dedicated to the protection of all native animals and plants in their natural communities. With nearly 1.2 million members and activists, Defenders of Wildlife is a leading advocate for innovative solutions to safeguard our wildlife heritage for generations to come. For more information, visit Newsroom.Defenders.org and follow us on Twitter @DefendersNews.


The Endangered Species Coalition is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to stop the human-caused extinction of our nation’s at-risk species, to protect and restore their habitats, and to guide these fragile populations along the road to recovery. 


Grand Canyon Wildlands is a nonprofit science-based conservation organization working to save and heal wild nature in the Grand Canyon region.