Saturday, July 14, 2018

Fifty-one Wolves Howling


What's better than a howling wolf? Fifty-one howling wolves! Enjoy!

Friday, July 13, 2018

House Lawmakers Seek to Gut Endangered Species Act

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The Endangered Species Act (ESA) was passed in 1973 because Americans believed that protecting our wildlife was an obligation to future generations, our nation’s environmental health, our fellow creatures, and the heart of the American way of life. It included wildlife ranges and habitats irrespective of political boundaries because these habitats, which are vital to species survival, cross arbitrary lines. Today, many politicians have forgotten the values Congress embraced four decades ago, and they now attempt to undermine one of most successful bipartisan pieces of legislation our country has ever adopted.

The ESA has given thousands of at-risk species a second chance for over four decades and has worked successfully to prevent the extinction of 99% of the species placed under its protection. A recent national poll found that the ESA is supported by 90% of American voters.

Despite its success and public support, a group of House lawmakers introduced a package of nine bills to gut the Endangered Species Act.

The ambitious legislative package would accomplish numerous longstanding Republican goals for weakening the ESA, like making it easier for the government to remove species from the endangered or threatened lists and preventing organizations from suing to try to get species protected.






The package comes less than two weeks after Sen. John Barrasso (R-Wyo.), chairman of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, introduced a comprehensive measure in that chamber to change the ESA.

Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Wyoming Ups Wolf Kill Quota to a Record 58 in Trophy Zone

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The Wyoming Game and Fish Commission just approved upping the kill quota in its "trophy Zone" this year to 58 animals, a 32% increase over last year’s quota of 44 and a record high since the species was reintroduced 23 years ago.

The trophy hunt season runs October 1 - December 31.

In the other 85% of the state outside the trophy zone, hunting wolves is on 365 days a year. Wolves are classified as shoot-on-sight vermin. Guns, snares, explosives - almost any form of violence is allowed to kill these animals.

It's the 21st century. Is this what wildlife "management" should look like in our time?

Monday, July 9, 2018

Free Red Wolf Webinar with Joseph Hinton, PhD on July 18



In an effort to broaden awareness and understanding for the red wolf recovery effort in North Carolina and the implications of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s proposed rule seeking to significantly change the size, scope, and management of the current red wolf recovery program in the state, the Wolf Conservation Center is extending a free webinar with Joseph Hinton, Ph.D. on Wednesday, July 18 at 6pm (EST).

Interested participants are encouraged to RSVP to info@nywolf.org.

An email with further details about participating will be posted by Monday, July 16.

The WCC hopes this educational opportunity inspires public participation during USFWS’s public comment period on the proposed rule - the comment period ends July 30.


BACKGROUND

On June 28, the USFWS announced a proposal that will no doubt result in the extinction of red wolves in the wild. Today, fewer than 30 wolves remain in the wild.

Beyond reducing the red wolf recovery area by nearly 90% and limiting the wild population to just 10-15 wolves, USFWS, the very agency charged by federal law with protecting endangered species, will allow people to kill red wolves who stray beyond the newly-designated recovery area – and without any repercussions.

There is a perceived notion that red wolves are a local or regional issue and that only the residents of North Carolina are impacted by the results of this recovery effort. Endangered species recovery, however, is a matter of pride and concern for all U.S. citizens. This is not an isolated issue for North Carolina. By succumbing to political pressure, the USFWS is allowing a small group of vocal landowners to dictate endangered species policy instead of adhering to proven scientific principles and practices.

You can read more about the proposal—including the options that the USFWS considered but did not choose—in the Draft Environmental Assessment.

Submit Public Comment

Suggested talking points (please personalize your message, if possible) found HERE.

Sunday, July 8, 2018

Take Action For World's Last Wild Red Wolves



On June 28, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) announced a proposal that will no doubt result in the extinction of red wolves in the wild. Today, fewer than 30 wolves remain in the wild.

Beyond reducing the red wolf recovery area by nearly 90% and limiting the wild population to just 10-15 wolves, USFWS, the very agency charged by federal law with protecting endangered species, will allow people to kill red wolves who stray beyond the newly-designated recovery area – and without any repercussions.

There is a perceived notion that red wolves are a local or regional issue and that only the residents of North Carolina are impacted by the results of this recovery effort. Endangered species recovery, however, is a matter of pride and concern for all U.S. citizens. This is not an isolated issue for North Carolina. By succumbing to political pressure, the USFWS is allowing a small group of vocal landowners to dictate endangered species policy instead of adhering to proven scientific principles and practices.

You can read more about the proposal—including the options that the USFWS considered but did not choose—in the Draft Environmental Assessment.

What You Can Do

Please attend the one public hearing the agency is holding and speak on behalf of the wolves:

Date: July 10, 2018
Time: Public information session: 5:30-6:30 pm/Public hearing: 7-9 pm
Location: Roanoke Festival Park, One Festival Park, Manteo, NC 27954

Submit Public Comment

Suggested Talking Points (Please personalize your message, if possible) Found HERE.

Thursday, July 5, 2018

Federal Action Could Push Last Wild Red Wolves to Extinction

Save the only wild red wolf population by limiting their numbers to just 15 in the wild?

That's exactly what U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is suggesting under their new proposal.

Last week, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) released its "Proposed Replacement of the Regulations for the Nonessential Experimental Population of Red Wolves in Northeastern North Carolina, a scientifically unsound plan that will no doubt result in the extinction of red wolves in the wild.

A small group of no more than 15 red wolves would be maintained in the North Carolina management area. Any wolves that wander outside of this zone would not be protected and could be legally hunted.

"It hurts to think that 20 out of the 35 wolves we have left in the wild on planet Earth are going to be fair game for anybody to shoot," said Ron Sutherland of Wildlands Network.

Wednesday, July 4, 2018

Happy Independence Day

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We must be free not because we claim freedom, but because we practice it. ~William Faulkner