Friday, September 24, 2010

Pillow Fight!

Wolf Conservation Center (WCC) staff and volunteers are always looking for unique ways to say "thank you" to the Ambassador wolves for helping us educate people about the importance of their wild brothers and sisters. Our enrichment gifts vary as do the responses from the wolves. See earlier posts: Something Fishy, Close Encounters of a Weird Kind, Otter Nonsense, Deli? Sure! New Delhi? Not so much..., and You're in for a Treat.

On October 1st, we'll be introducing an old sofa to Atka as a part of our LOBO NIGHT! program. Guests will have an opportunity to personalize the couch before we introduce it into Atka's territory and then we'll watch as he discovers the surprise! The gift won't be Atka's first encounter with household furnishings. We learned last spring that he loves a good pillow fight:)

Music: "Gene's Boogie" by The Amos Garrett, Doug Sahm, and Gene Taylor Band.

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

Week 2: What Will the Future Hold for Nine Special Lobos?

The last 40 or so wild-roaming endangered Mexican gray wolves call a vast stretch of forest in southeast Arizona and southwest New Mexico home. Roughly two-thirds of the available habitat for these wolves is in the state of New Mexico but only half of the current population resides in this state. When the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) integrates Mexican gray wolves into the wild directly from captivity, the animals are only released into Arizona. According to the Final Rule governing the Mexican Wolf reintroduction, the USFWS is prohibited from integrating these captive born wolves into other parts of their current range like New Mexico's Gila National Forest, home to a greater amount of available habitat. Captive wolves that were once in the wild, however, can be re-released into New Mexico, and this is where a wonderful opportunity for some special wolves begins.

Lobos of the Southwest is leading a nine-week campaign to encourage the USFWS to re-release into the wild nine wolves recaptured as young pups when their packs were removed for depredations between 2005 and 2007 under the now-discredited SOP 13.0 program. The nine wild-born wolves are still in captivity today and they are physically, genetically, and temperamentally suitable for release. These wolves are all eligible for re-release in New Mexico, where the majority the recovery area is located.

Every week for nine weeks, we will share information about Lobos of the Southwest's featured re-release candidate and will offer people an opportunity to speak up on behalf of each of the 9 wolves so they can one day resume their rightful place in the wild.

M1050 - Re-release Candidate for Week Two!
Photo: USFWS
M1050, littermate of M1049 (re-release candidate for week one), is the Mexican gray wolf release candidate of the week. Like his brother, wild-born M1050 was brought into captivity as a three-week-old puppy when his parents were trapped and removed for killing cattle. M1050 is eligible for re-release into New Mexico. His curiosity toward humans may make him unsuitable for release. That could change, however, if he is mated with a female. If so, he deserves a chance to live in the wild. If he proves to be a good release candidate, FREE M1050!

Send your e-mail to Director Benjamin Tuggle at RDTuggle@fws.gov.

Need help? Lobos of the Southwest made it easy! Send a very brief e-mail to FWS Region 2 Director Benjamin Tuggle. Simply copy and paste the message below into an email or use your own words. Please add your name and address at the end, because anonymous letters get little attention. Remember, too, that polite requests are more effective.

Dear Dr. Tuggle,
I am alarmed at how few Mexican gray wolves remain in the wild and I know that there are wild-born wolves in captivity that are eligible for New Mexico releases. Please re-release former Saddle pup M1050 in New Mexico. He has been in captivity long enough; it’s time for him to be a free, wild wolf again.
Thank you,
your name


Let him know you want M1050 to be a free, wild wolf again.

Check back next week for our next re-release candidate of the week. Thanks for your help!

To learn about the Mexican gray wolf re-release candidate for week one (M1049) and how to speak on his behalf, please click More!
More...

Lobos of the Southwest made it easy to help! Send a very brief e-mail to FWS Region 2 Director Benjamin Tuggle. Simply copy and paste the message below into an email or use your own words. Please add your name and address at the end, because anonymous letters get little attention. Remember, too, that polite requests are more effective.

Dear Dr. Tuggle,
I am alarmed at how few Mexican gray wolves remain in the wild and I know that there are wild-born wolves in captivity that are eligible for New Mexico releases. Please re-release former Saddle pup M1049 in New Mexico. He has been in captivity long enough; it’s time for him to be a free, wild wolf again.
Thank you,
your name


Here’s the first Mexican gray wolf re-release candidate of the week:




The Mexican gray wolf re-release candidate of the week is former Saddle pup M1049, born in the wild on May 7, 2007. He was captured with his mother and six littermates on May 31, 2007, when his parents were removed from the wild for killing cattle. The Mexican wolf field team captured alpha female AF797 first. Searchers had a hard time locating the tiny puppies, because their mother, disturbed by attempts to shoot or trap members of the pack, had moved them to a new den.

M1049 was taken to the Sevilleta pre-release facility on June 6, 2007. On May 20, 2009, he was transferred to Wild Canid Center in Missouri. Because he was just a small pup when he was captured and had no part in killing livestock, he is eligible for release in New Mexico. FREE M1049!

Send your e-mail to Director Benjamin Tuggle at RDTuggle@fws.gov.
Let him know you want M1049 to be a free, wild wolf again.



Check back here or Lobos of the Southwest next week for the next re-release candidate of the week. Thanks for your help!

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

Week 1: What will the Future Hold for Nine Special Lobos?

The last 40 or so wild-roaming endangered Mexican gray wolves call a vast stretch of forest in southeast Arizona and southwest New Mexico home. Roughly two-thirds of the available habitat for these wolves is in the state of New Mexico but only half of the current population resides in this state. When the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) integrates Mexican gray wolves into the wild directly from captivity, the animals are only released into Arizona. According to the Final Rule governing the Mexican Wolf reintroduction, the USFWS is prohibited from integrating these captive born wolves into other parts of their current range like New Mexico's Gila National Forest, home to a greater amount of available habitat. Captive wolves that were once in the wild, however, can be re-released into New Mexico, and this is where a wonderful opportunity for some special wolves begins.
Photo: USFWS

Lobos of the Southwest is leading a nine-week campaign to encourage the USFWS to re-release into the wild nine wolves recaptured as young pups when their packs were removed for depredations between 2005 and 2007 under the now-discredited SOP 13.0 program. The nine wild-born wolves are still in captivity today and they are physically, genetically, and temperamentally suitable for release. These wolves are all eligible for re-release in New Mexico, where the majority the recovery area is located.

Every week for nine weeks, we will share information about Lobos of the Southwest's featured re-release candidate and will offer people an opportunity to speak up on behalf of each of the 9 wolves so they can one day resume their rightful place in the wild.

M1050 - Re-release Candidate for Week Two!
Photo: USFWS
M1050, littermate of M1049 (re-release candidate for week one), is the Mexican gray wolf release candidate of the week. Like his brother, wild-born M1050 was brought into captivity as a three-week-old puppy when his parents were trapped and removed for killing cattle. M1050 is eligible for re-release into New Mexico. His curiosity toward humans may make him unsuitable for release. That could change, however, if he is mated with a female. If so, he deserves a chance to live in the wild. If he proves to be a good release candidate, FREE M1050!

Send your e-mail to Director Benjamin Tuggle at RDTuggle@fws.gov.

Need help? Lobos of the Southwest made it easy! Send a very brief e-mail to FWS Region 2 Director Benjamin Tuggle. Simply copy and paste the message below into an email or use your own words. Please add your name and address at the end, because anonymous letters get little attention. Remember, too, that polite requests are more effective.

Dear Dr. Tuggle,
I am alarmed at how few Mexican gray wolves remain in the wild and I know that there are wild-born wolves in captivity that are eligible for New Mexico releases. Please re-release former Saddle pup M1050 in New Mexico. He has been in captivity long enough; it’s time for him to be a free, wild wolf again.
Thank you,
your name


Let him know you want M1050 to be a free, wild wolf again.

Check back next week for our next re-release candidate of the week. Thanks for your help!

To learn about the Mexican gray wolf re-release candidate for week one (M1049) and how to speak on his behalf, please click More!
More...

Lobos of the Southwest made it easy to help! Send a very brief e-mail to FWS Region 2 Director Benjamin Tuggle. Simply copy and paste the message below into an email or use your own words. Please add your name and address at the end, because anonymous letters get little attention. Remember, too, that polite requests are more effective.

Dear Dr. Tuggle,
I am alarmed at how few Mexican gray wolves remain in the wild and I know that there are wild-born wolves in captivity that are eligible for New Mexico releases. Please re-release former Saddle pup M1049 in New Mexico. He has been in captivity long enough; it’s time for him to be a free, wild wolf again.
Thank you,
your name


Here’s the first Mexican gray wolf re-release candidate of the week:




The Mexican gray wolf re-release candidate of the week is former Saddle pup M1049, born in the wild on May 7, 2007. He was captured with his mother and six littermates on May 31, 2007, when his parents were removed from the wild for killing cattle. The Mexican wolf field team captured alpha female AF797 first. Searchers had a hard time locating the tiny puppies, because their mother, disturbed by attempts to shoot or trap members of the pack, had moved them to a new den.

M1049 was taken to the Sevilleta pre-release facility on June 6, 2007. On May 20, 2009, he was transferred to Wild Canid Center in Missouri. Because he was just a small pup when he was captured and had no part in killing livestock, he is eligible for release in New Mexico. FREE M1049!

Send your e-mail to Director Benjamin Tuggle at RDTuggle@fws.gov.
Let him know you want M1049 to be a free, wild wolf again.



Check back here or Lobos of the Southwest next week for the next re-release candidate of the week. Thanks for your help!

Wednesday, September 8, 2010

Red Wolf Pups Getting Older But Not Bolder

As tradition dictates, during Labor Day weekend the reclusive 4-month-old red wolf pups at the Wolf Conservation Center cautiously emerged from their den. Having seen their shadows, signaling the end of the summer, they quickly returned to their elusive ways. OK, maybe we're confusing our holidays, but it was nice to get a good look at the ever-growing pups!



If you want to try to spot the red wolf pack yourself, visit our live WOLFCAM. If you see something cool, let us know on the WCC's FaceBook Page!

Tuesday, September 7, 2010

Wolf Watcher's Spotlight on the Lobo

During a hot day in August, Dave Hornoff of WOLFWATCHER.COM stopped by the WCC with Brooke, his lovely 12-yr-old niece, to talk about wolves and their recovery. It was a really nice visit, Brooke had never seen real wolves before (Kaila was officially her first!) and Dave was able to gain some insight on the WCC's role in the Mexican wolf conservation effort as a participating facility in the Mexican Wolf Species Survival plan. Here is Dave's video of WCC's Maggie Howell describing some of the thrills and challenges of helping lobos resume their rightful place in the wild.



To learn more about Wolf Watcher please visit wolfwatcher.com and join the discussion on Wolf Watcher's FaceBook Page.

Friday, September 3, 2010

Strolling With Kaila

Just a quick look at the grande dame of the Wolf Conservation Center in South Salem, NY. Kaila is a 15 year-old Canadian/Rocky Mountain gray wolf. When we saw her out on her favorite perch this morning we couldn't resist shooting some footage. Maybe it's not our most exciting video, but everybody deserves a look at this lovely lady!

Thursday, September 2, 2010

Buggin' Out!

It's a beautiful summer day, but red wolf M1483, can't quite relax...



If you want to try to spot the red wolf pack yourself, visit our live WOLFCAM. If you see something cool, let us know on our Facebook Page!

Wednesday, September 1, 2010

Labor Day is Approaching and WCC Volunteers are Taking the Holiday Literally!

(In photo Left to right: Diane Biegler, Chris Ruppert, Nancy Koury, Maggie Howell, Barbara Mignano, Chris Mars)

August 31, 2010 - A dedicated crew of WCC volunteers rolled up their sleeves yesterday and got elbow deep in woodchips all in the name of wolves! It was hot and muggy but the weather didn’t slow down our team and by day’s end we had accomplished more than we had imagined. Hauling, shoveling, and spreading rocks, woodchips, and soil is hard work, but we were rewarded when we watched Ambassador wolves Kaila and Atka explore their newly improved enclosures. Nothing like seeing a wolf smile… Once our chores were completed, ice cream was in demand by workers and wolves alike.

If you are interested in joining our Wolf Work Team, please contact Maggie at maggie@nywolf.org so we can get in touch before the next chore day soon!