Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Eleven Year Old Running Like a Wolf to Raise Awareness



Eleven year-old Peyton from New Hampshire is running a half marathon on October 4th to raise awareness for wolves and support the Wolf Conservation Center!

Peyton has felt a strong connection to wolves ever since he watched an episode of the Wild Kratts 4 years ago. He learned that wolves are loyal, family oriented, and have an aptitude for running long distances. But, he was alarmed to hear that some wolves remain critically endangered.

After seeing his mom run the Marine Corps Marathon to support 96 Elephants, and his older sister earn a spot as Nickelodeon’s spokesperson for environmental awareness, Peyton knew he wanted to do something for the wolves. Running was a natural fit!

Please join the WCC and throw back your head and let out a long supportive howl for Peyton - an inspirational kiddo who exemplifies the amazing potential of his generation to make this world a better place!

Please visit Peyton’s CrowdRise page to support his effort!


Tuesday, September 29, 2015

New Mexico Game Commission Deals Another Blow To Mexican Gray Wolf Recovery



In another blow for Mexican gray wolf recovery, the New Mexico Game Commission, under Governor Susana Martinez, voted unanimously today to DENY the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) permission to release wolves in the Gila National Forest. New Mexico Game and Fish withdrew its support for the Mexican wolf program in 2011. Now, the Commission and Department are refusing to allow any Mexican gray wolves to be released from captivity into the wild.

The state's Game Commission and it's agenda is clearly out of step with the majority of New Mexico voters who support wolf recovery and is pushing the critically endangered lobo even closer to extinction.

Do you think it's time for USFWS to exercise its federal authority to ensure the recovery of endangered Mexican gray wolves? What say you?

Read more via Center for Biological Diversity.

The Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) or “lobo” is the most genetically distinct lineage of wolves in the Western Hemisphere, and one of the most endangered mammals in North America. By the mid-1980s, hunting, trapping, and poisoning caused the extinction of lobos in the wild, with only a handful remaining in captivity. In 1998 the wolves were reintroduced into the wild as part of a federal reintroduction program under the Endangered Species Act. Today in the U.S., there is a single wild population comprising only 109 individuals.

Sunday, September 27, 2015

Super Blood Moon Lunar Eclipse and Wolves. Awesome.

Protect the Endangered Species Act



Right now, Western Governors are visiting Washington, D.C. to engage with Congressional leaders on critical issues and policy affecting the West, including state authority and the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Their intent is to recommend reforms to the Act that benefit large corporations and other special interests.

The ESA was passed in 1973 because Americans believed that protecting our wildlife was an obligation to future generations, our nation’s environmental health, our fellow creatures, and the heart of the American way of life. It included wildlife ranges and habitats irrespective of political boundaries because these habitats, which are vital to species survival, cross arbitrary lines. Today, many politicians have forgotten the values Congress embraced four decades ago, and they now attempt to undermine one of most successful bipartisan pieces of legislation our country has ever adopted.

With extinction there is no turning back, no second chance. Thankfully, the ESA has given thousands of at-risk species a second chance for over four decades and has worked successfully to prevent the extinction of 99% of the species placed under its protection. A national poll conducted this year found that the Endangered Species Act is supported by 90% of American voters.

Despite its success and public support, the ESA is under attack like never before. Some members of Congress have introduced dozens of legislative proposals that seek to gut the ESA, block its protections for wolves, other imperiled species and habitat, and obstruct our ability to enforce this federal law.

Please urge your congressional representative and senators to preserve the spirit and integrity of this robust federal law and to oppose any legislation that takes aim at imperiled wildlife!

TAKE ACTION

This action is open to U.S. residents only.

Friday, September 25, 2015

You Cannot Love Game and Hate Wolves



One of the most common objections to predators on the landscape is their impact on prey populations. As far back as 1938, Aldo Leopold set the record straight. While the best-available science may indicate that we have the technical ability to "manage" a wolf hunt without endangering the population viability, there is no science, past or present, that concludes it is absolutely necessary to hunt wolves.

From Aldo Leopold's "Conservation" (1938):

"Harmony with land is like harmony with a friend; you cannot cherish his right hand and chop off his left. That is to say, you cannot love game and hate predators; you cannot conserve the waters and waste the ranges; you cannot build the forest and mine the farm.

The land is one organism. Its parts, like our own parts, compete with each other and cooperate with each other. The competition is as much a part of the inner workings as the cooperation. You can regulate them - cautiously - but not abolish them."

Thursday, September 24, 2015

Wolf Conservation Center's Red Wolf Pups: Essential, Healthy, and Full of Surprises



On May 2, 2015, red wolf F1563 (a.k.a. Salty) gave birth to a litter of pups. All of them adorable and each a valuable contribution to the recovery of his and her rare and at-risk species. Under Red Wolf Species Survival Plan (SSP) protocols, captive born pups must be checked during certain milestones in their development. On September 21st, we conducted the most recent health-check.

 

The Wolf Conservation Center staff and volunteers gathered early in the morning to locate, capture, and “process” the pups. Our goal is to record heart rates and weights and administer wormer and the final of a series of three Distemper/Parvo vaccinations. As newborns, each pup could fit in the palm of one's hand. Now at four and a half months old, the kiddos look less like pups and more like mini wolves.

Wolf Pup f2120, aka Charlotte
Once they were all captured, Paul Maus, DVM, our veterinarian who donates his time and expertise to the WCC, thoroughly examined the kiddos and they all looked robust (weights listed below), healthy, and terribly to cute! And to our surprise, we discovered one pup is not who we thought… Wolf pup f2120, aka Charlotte, is alive.

In mid-July one of the pups passed away at just 10 weeks old. A necropsy (autopsy for animals) revealed that the youngster died of trauma, a puncture to the intestine. The injury was likely an accident, but tragic nonetheless. Although the body of the pup was partially decomposed, we were confident that the pup was the lone female of the litter who we affectionately called “Charlotte.”  It turns out we were wrong.  Charlotte is alive! While this is wonderful news, we remember the loss of her brother – an adorable and endangered pup who unknowingly touched the hearts of WCC staff, volunteers, and supporters following the pups’ progress via webcam. RIP, Pup.

Pup Weights as of September 21, 2015
  • Wolf Pup m2116 - 25.4lbs
  • Wolf Pup m2117 - 27lbs
  • Wolf Pup m2118 - 29lbs
  • Wolf Pup m2119 – 31.8lbs
  • Wolf Pup f2120 – 29.2lbs
Earlier this summer all the pups received a microchip linking each to his/her alphanumeric name. Wild wolves and wolves associated with a recovery program are often given an identification number recorded in an official studbook that tracks their history.  Letters (M = Male, F = Female) preceding the number indicate the sex of the animal and are capitalized for adult animals 24 months or older.  Lower case letters (m = male, f = female) indicate wolves younger than 24 months or pups.

Follow the pups’ progress via webcam and let us know what you see!

Take Action for Red Wolves

Red wolves remain among the world’s most endangered species. The current estimate puts the only wild population of red wolves at their lowest level (50 – 75) since the late 1990s.

Only one place on the planet are wild red wolf populations viable and secure – North Carolina. But the state’s Wildlife Resources Commission has asked U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) to terminate the red wolf recovery program there, a move which would inevitably result in the loss of the last wild population of red wolves and render the species extinct in the wild.

While USFWS, the very agency charged by federal law with protecting the endangered species, continues to review the program, it has halted all captive-to-wild releases and management activity critical to the success of this recovery program.

Please sign the petition to urge USFWS to restore the Red Wolf Recovery Program.

SIGN HERE

Words of Wisdom


Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Happy Autumnal Equinox from the Wolf Conservation Center!


Monday, September 21, 2015

A New Chapter Opens for an Endangered Red Wolf



Today we open a new chapter in the life of red wolf F2074, a special gal affectionately nicknamed "Gracie" by the Wolf Conservation Center's webcam community. The one-year-old has left her family nest to embark on what we hope will be an exciting and romantic adventure!

Every summer, the Species Survival Plan (SSP) management group for the red wolf determines the program's breeding pairs. Wolves are “mono-estrus” - breeding only once a year during the winter months. Hence, winter can be an exciting time for wolves in North America, the WCC, and this year for red wolf F2074 (Gracie) too!

Gracie will be moving to the Rosamond Gifford Zoo where she’ll meet her male companion, hopefully breed, and contribute to the recovery of their critically endangered species via potential pups!

Although Gracie will be missed, we are excited for her and eager to follow her future endeavors. The special wolf stands out from the rest. Due to a bone deformity, her rear leg is misshapen and gives her an uneven gait. What makes her stand out the most, however, is not her appearance, but her role as a babysitter, a jester, and an emissary of her species by unknowingly making the lives of all who watched her a little brighter, goofier, and more wild.

Good luck, kiddo!

  

Miley Cyrus travels to B.C.’s Great Bear Rainforest with Pacific Wild



September 20, 2015 - Miley Cyrus and her brother Braison traveled to the Great Bear Rainforest on the central coast of British Columbia this weekend to join local wildlife conservationists from Pacific Wild on a research trip.

 
RELEASE: Miley Cyrus travels to B.C.’s Great Bear Rainforest from Pacific Wild on Vimeo.

“The government of British Columbia is waging war on wildlife, and it should come as no surprise that their policies are garnering international scrutiny and condemnation,” said Ian McAllister, co-founder and director of Pacific Wild, the conservation group leading the expedition.

Miley and Braison spent two days with Mary and John Theberge, PhD, renowned wolf biologists and outspoken opponents of the B.C. wolf kill; Carl Safina, PhD, American ecologist and author; and members of the Kitasoo/Xais’Xai First Nation, one of the coastal First Nations fighting to end trophy hunting in British Columbia.

“When I first spoke out, I knew in my heart that the wolf cull was wrong,” said Miley. “But after this visit, I know science is on my side, not just on the wolf cull, but also on the trophy hunt issue. Both are unsustainable and both are horrific. Both have to end.”

Efforts to combat the declining population of the endangered animals have emphasized predator control in the form a wolf cull, a tactic that Pacific Wild and other leading conservation and animal welfare organizations believe is ineffective and avoiding the real issue – habitat encroachment and fragmentation by industry, humans, and recreational snowmobiling.

Together with the support of Miley and Braison, the Theberges, Dr. Safina, and a host of environmental groups, Pacific Wild will continue to call for an end to the wolf kill program along with permanent, fully-protected habitat for B.C. caribou.

To speak with Ian McAllister, or to interview the scientists who joined the trip, please contact: Michaela Montaner of Pacific Wild.

If you haven't already, please add your voice by signing Pacific Wild's petition here.

Sunday, September 20, 2015

The Emmy Awards Get Thrown to the Wolves

...and the Emmy for outstanding ensemble in a Drama series goes to the RED WOLF PUPS in Game of Thrones​' "The Struggle for the Iron Bone!"


Saturday, September 19, 2015

Wolf Conservation Center Webcams Draw a Wild Crowd

Thanks to the Wolf Conservation Center's (WCC) collection of webcams, the Center's educational impact far exceeds the boundary of it's gates in South Salem, NY!  WCC webcams invite an unlimited number of viewers to enter the private lives of elusive wolf families and to better understand the importance of their wild kin.

The webcams have been wildly popular among people (er.... species) all around the world!

Tune in!


 

Tuesday, September 15, 2015

Howls of Thanks to the Greenville Zoo



Howls of thanks to the Greenville Zoo for its generous "Quarters for Conservation" grant of almost $7000 to support the Wolf Conservation Center's efforts to protect and recover critically endangered red wolves!

Through the collection of quarters, the zoo and local community provide much-needed funding for a number of wildlife conservation projects around the globe.

Learn more.


Monday, September 14, 2015

Relentless Red Wolf Pups Hassle Mom For Food



Red wolf mother F1563 (a.k.a. Salty) shows off some impressive moves to elude her five relentless 4-month-old pups as they whine, and paw and lick about her muzzle hoping to elicit regurgitation. Adults feed pups who are too old to nurse but too young to hunt for themselves by regurgitation. This method of food transfer is unnecessary for humans, but proves an efficient way for a number of different species to feed their young. For wolves, the behavior of licking the muzzle is retained into adulthood by subordinate wolves where it functions as a gesture to reaffirm their role and station with the family.

Does your dog ever lick you on the mouth and nose?


Take Action for Red Wolves

Red wolves remain among the world’s most endangered species. The current estimate puts the only wild population of red wolves at their lowest level (50 – 75) since the late 1990s.

Only one place on the planet are wild red wolf populations viable and secure – North Carolina. But the state’s Wildlife Resources Commission has asked U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) to terminate the red wolf recovery program there, a move which would inevitably result in the loss of the last wild population of red wolves and render the species extinct in the wild.

While USFWS, the very agency charged by federal law with protecting the endangered species, continues to review the program, it has halted all captive-to-wild releases and management activity critical to the success of this recovery program.

Please sign the petition to urge USFWS to restore the Red Wolf Recovery Program.

SIGN HERE

Sunday, September 13, 2015

Happy New Year

Lone Wolf Behind Deflategate?

NFL investigating Ambassador wolf Atka for his role in ‪"Deflategate‬!" What do you think, is Atka guilty?


Friday, September 11, 2015

Whether She's "Twerking" or Not, Science is on Miley Cyrus's Side



Earlier this week Miley Cyrus​ took to Instagram to urge fans to sign Pacific Wild​'s petition to end British Columbia's wolf cull. Now BC Premier Christy Clark says Cyrus should stop meddling in the province's environmental policies and to stick to what she knows best, twerking. Whether she's "twerking" or not, science is on Miley's side. So perhaps Premier Christy Clark should take a break from insulting pop stars so she can follow the science.

 • As reported in the Canadian Journal of Zoology in Nov 2014, killing wolves to save endangered Caribou fails to achieve any improvement in Boreal Woodland Caribou survival.

 • According to a Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS) report, the places where the caribou are most at risk in BC are where habitats are threatened by seismic lines, pipelines, roads and fracking - not wolves.

So thank you, Miley Cyrus, for bringing attention to BC's unscientific and unethical wolf cull and for using your voice to prevent the cruel and unnecessary deaths of thousands of BC wolves.

Please sign and share the petition here.

Thank you!

Remember...



Please take a moment to remember those lost and affected on 9/11 and those who are still suffering. Of the 10,000 responders at Ground Zero, 300 were dogs. The Dog Files tells their story.


Thursday, September 10, 2015

Northeast Wolf Coalition: Our Vision For Wolf Recovery


“Like winds and sunsets, wild things were taken for granted until progress began to do away with them. Now we face the question whether a still higher 'standard of living' is worth its cost in things natural, wild and free.” ~Aldo Leopold, Foreword to a Sand County Almanac (1949)

With those words, conservationist Aldo Leopold began a serious dialog about the state of wild lands and wildlife on the American landscape. For those of us who live in the Northeast, this conversation has never been more critical. For more than a century, the northeastern United States has been regaining its wildness. Where forests had been largely cleared in 19th century, the woods have returned. Where wildlife such as moose, bear, beaver—even deer—had been eliminated, these animals have rebounded. While this is cause for hope, this remarkable recovery seems incomplete. 

The decline of large predators and other apex consumers at the top of the food chain has disrupted ecosystems all over our continent, and it is arguably humankind's most pervasive influence on the natural world. For our region, the wolf is the missing component of our regional ecology and one of the top predators that once called the Northeast its home.

Recognizing the need to explore the need for this apex predator and the potential for its recovery in the Northeast USA, the Northeast Wolf Coalition was established in March, 2014 as an alliance of conservation organizations in New York, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts and Connecticut and beyond. The Coalition’s work is guided by some of our nation’s best and brightest conservation scientists to ensure the foundation of its work is based on the application of the best available and most current scientific principles. The Coalition believes the return of the wolf will reflect a more fully functional and wild Northeast, with wolves fulfilling dynamic and evolving ecological functions in the changing environments that comprise our region.

As conservationists in the 21st century, we are faced with the challenge of helping nature continue to heal and flourish for future generations. Thus, the need to explore the critical factors that affect the wolf’s return and its potentially positive impact to the natural biological diversity of the Northeast has never been more important.

The Northeast Wolf Coalition envisions ecologically effective wolf populations in healthy, diverse ecosystems managed as a public trust across North America. To achieve that vision, wildlife conservationists must be equipped with a foundation of knowledge and the necessary tools to proceed with due diligence to promote wolf recovery in the region.

Thus, it is the a priority of the Northeast Wolf Coalition to, first and foremost, encourage effective trans-boundary cooperative relationships with federal, state, and provincial agencies, organizations, and the general public so that we can collaboratively explore and design the best policies and practices that will encourage the wolf's natural return to the region.

To learn more about the Northeast Wolf Coalition, visit http://www.northeastwolf.org/

Wednesday, September 9, 2015

Was Echo the Wolf Set Up by Utah to Be Killed?



During the fall of 2014, an endangered female gray wolf reached a wild milestone. Born in the Northern Rockies, she traveled hundreds of miles to become the first confirmed gray wolf to return to the Grand Canyon's north rim in over 70 years. Her name was Echo. Her name was chosen from over 500 entries in a global contest. Ten-year old contest winner Zachary Tanner from Milwaukie, Oregon, said he chose the name Echo “because she came back to the Grand Canyon like an Echo does.”

On Nov. 20 two people in a vehicle saw and photographed a radio-collared wolf crossing a highway in southern Utah, 95 miles northwest of the Grand Canyon. Many speculated she was Echo. While this lone wolf kept on her feet and out of all trouble, she unknowingly became a media sensation, rewildling the minds and hearts around the world. Her homecoming, however, was not celebrated by all. Echo's story stirred a community of wolf-haters who posted threats to do harm despite her protection under federal law.

Echo was illegally shot and killed in Utah a month later on December 28th. The hunter claimed he mistook the collared wolf for a coyote.

Recently released documents now show that officials with Utah’s Division of Wildlife Resources continued to offer a bounty to encourage the killing of coyotes within the area of her sighting even though Echo was federally protected under the Endangered Species Act.

She had a name. She had a collar. She had protection under federal law. 
Was Echo set up by Utah to be killed?

Read more via Center for Biological Diversity's Press Release.

Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Endangered Mexican Gray Wolf Slated to Breed This Winter


It might still be September but Wolf Conservation Center (WCC) staff and volunteers have their minds on winter...

 During the summer, the Species Survival Plan (SSP) management group for the Mexican gray wolf determined the program’s breeding pairs for the 2015-16 season. Wolves are “mono-estrus” -- breeding only once a year during the winter months. Hence, winter can be an exciting time for wolves in North America, the WCC, and this year for Mexican gray wolf M1133 (a.k.a. Rhett) too!

The lobo has been a lone wolf since losing his mate, F810 (a.k.a. Scarlett) last spring to a uterine infection. His bachelor days will some to a close, however, when Mexican gray wolf F1226 arrives from U.S. Fish and Wildlife's Sevilleta Wolf Management Facility later this month to join the WCC family. M1133 and F1226 are genetically valuable individuals and have been selected to breed because their offspring will increase the genetic diversity of their rare species.

While we cannot predict how the pair will get along, their introduction and possible seduction should be an exciting new chapter of M1133's life.

Learn more about M1133's story here.
Join M1133 via LIVE Webcam.

 

The Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) or “lobo” is the most genetically distinct lineage of wolves in the Western Hemisphere, and one of the most endangered mammals in North America. By the mid-1980s, hunting, trapping, and poisoning caused the extinction of lobos in the wild, with only a handful remaining in captivity. In 1998 the wolves were reintroduced into the wild as part of a federal reintroduction program under the Endangered Species Act. At last count in January 2015, there is a single wild population in the U.S. comprising only 109 individuals.

Monday, September 7, 2015

Happy Labor Day


Sunday, September 6, 2015

Do Mother Nature a Favor


Are you headed to the beach this weekend? Please do Mother Nature a favor and pick up at least one piece of garbage and dispose of it properly. Remember, marine debris begins and ends with us. Thank you!

Learn more

Thursday, September 3, 2015

End Trapping Within the National Wildlife Refuge System


"Wild creatures, like men, must have a place to live. As civilization creates cities, builds highways, and drains marshes, it takes away, little by little, the land that is suitable for wildlife. And as their space for living dwindles, the wildlife populations themselves decline. Refuges resist this trend by saving some areas from encroachment, and by preserving in them, or restoring where necessary, the conditions that wild things need in order to live." 
~ Rachel Carson, author, scientist, and chief editor for the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (1939-1952) 

The National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS) is the world’s premier system of public lands set aside for the protection of wildlife, fish and plants. The NWRS’s stated mission is “to administer a national network of lands and waters for the conservation, management, and where appropriate, restoration of the fish, wildlife, and plant resources and their habitats within the United States for the benefit of present and future generations of Americans.” Refuges are intended to be safe havens for wildlife.

Yet the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) permits trapping within the refuge system.

Conibear traps, and steel-jaw leghold traps— are inhumane and inherently nonselective. They injure and kill countless nontarget animals annually, including endangered and threatened species, and even family pets. Conibear traps, and steel-jaw leghold traps— are inhumane and inherently nonselective. They injure and kill countless nontarget animals annually, including endangered and threatened species, and even family pets.

The value and importance of conserving species and ensuring biodiversity is an accepted axiom of the 21st century. Thus it’s not surprising that close to 90 countries have banned the use of traps. The United States, however, is not among this list. These barbaric hunting tools are still allowed in our country and on federal refuge lands intended to protect and conserve our nation's wildlife.

These traps are indiscriminate, inhumane, and their use in a refuge is simply intolerable.

The Refuge from Cruel Trapping Act (H.R. 2016/S. 1081) was introduced in both the US House of Representatives and the Senate by Rep. Nita Lowey (D-NY) and Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) and needs support in order to pass.

Please ask your Senators and U.S. Representative to cosponsor the Refuge from Cruel Trapping Act today!

Thank you!