Saturday, February 25, 2017

Wolves and Howling



Although wolves use varied vocalizations to express themselves, if you ask anyone about wolf sounds, it's likely the howl that comes to mind. Howling helps keep family members (or pack-mates) together. Because a pack's territory can range over vast areas, it’s not unusual for members of the pack to become separated from one another. Wolves can call to one another over great distances by howling. A howl’s low pitch and long duration is well suited for transmission on the wild landscape – a wolf’s howl can be heard up to 10 miles away in open terrain! Wolves can howl to locate other wolves, advertise the size of their pack, to warn other family members of danger using a bark howl, and more. Just like us, each wolf has a unique voice so distinctive features of each individual's howl allow wolves to identify each other. And when every member of the pack joins the chorus, the singular howls and their harmonies give the listener the impression that pack is larger than it actually is.

What do you think Zephyr is saying?

Alaska Board of Game Votes Rejects Denali Wolf Buffer

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Despite Denali's plummeting wolf population and the EXTINCTION of a particularly famous wolf family who called the national park home, in an unanimous vote yesterday the Alaska Board of Game rejected the proposed wolf trophy hunting/trapping ban in the eastern and northern boundary of Denali National Park. More.

Sadly, Denali wolves, bears and wolverines will continue to be lured to bait stations, trapped, snared and shot, in the backyard of Alaska's most popular national park.

With Denali hosting over a half-million visitors each year, does it make sense for Alaska to kill the very animals they're hoping to see?


Snapshot today, snap trapped tomorrow...

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Killing wolves and their pups on National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska?

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Urgent - Alaska's Wolves Need Your Help

Killing wolves and their pups, shooting mother bears and cubs in their dens, aerial gunning, snaring... on OUR National Wildlife Refuges?

On February 16, 2017, the House voted on H. J. RES. 69 which aims to repeal a federal rule that prohibits the inhumane slaughter of Alaskan wolf and bear populations on National Wildlife Refuges.

Find out how your Rep. voted here. The Wolf Conservation Center expresses its gratitude to the lawmakers who voted “no” on this misguided resolution.

H.J. Res. 69 is now before the Senate, where it must be passed and sent to President Trump for signature before it can take effect.

Please urge your Senators to stand up for America's wildlife and the National Wildlife Refuge System by opposing H. J. Res. 69. Thank you!

Take Action.

Monday, February 20, 2017

Economic Benefits of Federal Lands in the West

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A newly published study challenged arguments that public lands kill economic opportunity and job creation. The study evaluated data from 276 rural counties in 11 Western states — Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington and Wyoming. You can read it here: Federal Lands in the West: Liability or Asset?

It found that population, employment and personal income, on average, "grew significantly faster" in Western rural counties "with the highest share of federal lands compared to counties with the lowest share of federal lands." Federal lands in the study include national parks, wilderness, national conservation areas, national monuments and national wildlife refuges - the home of America's wildlife.

Thursday, February 16, 2017

We are not trophies. We are brothers.



URGENT

Please urge your representatives to OPPOSE the War on Wolves Act (H.R. 424 & S.164) - legislation slated to allow wolves to be hunted and trapped for trophy in 4 states.

Take Action.

Not only is the War on Wolves Act (H.R. 424 and S.164) poised to strip federal protection for wolves in four states to allow trophy hunting/trapping to resume, it also undermines the integrity of our nation’s most significant environmental law - the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

The ESA requires the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to base all listing and delisting decisions on the best available science. Thus, when determining whether to end endangered species protection, federal law requires that an independent panel of scientists provide an objective scientific review of the federal agency's proposals. The War on Wolves Act blatantly ignores this federal mandate and stands to weaken the ESA itself.

Science has concluded that we have entered an unprecedented period of climate change and human-caused Sixth Mass extinction. As conservationists in the 21st century, we face the growing challenge of helping imperiled species heal and flourish and supporting biodiversity for future generations, not dismantling the cornerstone of our nation’s conservation law.

If we destroy the ESA, we are killing more than a law. We are killing endangered species. And no species should have to face extinction at the hands of humanity, much less twice.

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

New Bill Aiming to Hijack Lobo Recovery Planning

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Senator Flake (R-AZ) today reintroduced the deceptively named "Mexican Gray Wolf Recovery Plan Act," a bill that would give unchecked power in Mexican gray wolf recovery planning to special interests and Arizona and New Mexico - states that have repeatedly obstructed efforts to recover the critically endangered species.

Hunting, trapping, and poisoning caused the extinction of Mexican gray wolves in the wild, with only a handful remaining in captivity. Now the species is facing extinction a second time, but at the hands of politicians.

Happy Valentine's Day


Sunday, February 12, 2017

A Snowy Wolf is a Happy Wolf


Wolves are designed by the pressures of nature to be well adapted to survive on the cold and snowy landscape. Ambassador wolf Zephyr, like his wild counterparts, has two layers of fur: the long guard hairs that form the visible outer layer of of the coat and the soft dense undercoat. The coarse guard hairs determine a wolf's appearance/color and works like a raincoat, protecting a wolf from rain, snow, and sleet. The insulating undercoat is usually gray in color and keeps the animal comfortable in cold temperatures. The paws of a wolf are large, almost the size of an adult human hand, and thus able to perform like snowshoes carrying wolves effortlessly atop the crusty layer of deep snow. Zephyr's fluffy tail can also keep his nose warm and cozy. Thanks to these special features, wolves can thrive in temperatures well below freezing!

Friday, February 10, 2017

New Data Supporting Paradigm Shift in Carnivore Conservation From Control to Coexistence

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“…this is why the caribou and the wolf are one; for the caribou feeds the wolf, but it is the wolf who keeps the caribou strong.” 
~ Eskimo legend as told to Farley Mowat (Mowat 1973:85)

For 90 years, the American Society of Mammalogists (ASM) has made science-based challenges to widespread lethal control of native mammals, particularly by the U.S. federal government targeting carnivores in the western states.

A consensus is emerging among ecologists that extirpated, depleted, and destabilized populations of large predators, like wolves, are negatively affecting the overall biodiversity and resilience of ecosystems.

An interdisciplinary group of wildlife biologists and social scientists has just published a series of papers presenting new evidence of the greater efficacy and social acceptability of nonlethal deterrents to livestock depredation by large carnivores, as well as the lack of justification and possible harm to populations and ecosystems resulting from lethal control of these predators. A Special Feature on Predator Control in the February 2017 issue of the Journal of Mammalogy compiles evidence of these effects on wolves in Idaho, Wisconsin, and Michigan, and dingoes in Australia, and also provides new evidence of the growing intolerance for lethal control in the attitudes of the American public.

More.

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Protect the Endangered Species Act




Hunting, trapping, and poisoning caused the extinction of Mexican gray wolves in the wild, with only a handful remaining in captivity. The Endangered Species Act gave these Mexican wolf pups a second chance.

It appears evident that some politicians have forgotten the bipartisan values that Congress embraced four decades ago when it first passed the Endangered Species Act. This federal law has given thousands of at-risk species a second chance and has worked successfully to prevent the extinction of 99% of the species placed under its protection. A 2015 national poll found that 90% of American voters support the ESA.

Despite its success and public support, the strongest and most important federal law protecting imperiled wildlife and plants is under attack - deemed by its opponents as a burdensome regulation.

Science has concluded that we have entered an unprecedented period of climate change and human-caused Sixth Mass extinction. As conservationists in the 21st century, we are faced with the growing challenge of helping imperiled species heal and flourish and supporting biodiversity for future generations, not dismantling the cornerstone of our nation’s conservation law.

When you dismantle the ESA, you are killing more than a law. And no species should have to face extinction at the hands of humanity, much less twice.

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Howling Mad Protest For Mexican Gray Wolves




Mexican gray wolf supporters, including our own Executive Director, Maggie Howell, and Youth Education Director, Regan Downey, gathered today in Santa Fe, New Mexico to protest roadblocks to saving endangered Mexican gray wolves enacted by Govornor Susana Martinez.
More.

Under Gov. Martinez, the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in May and obtained an injunction barring the federal agency from releasing wolves into the wild in the state. The federal government and conservation organizations have appealed that injunction, but while the appeal is being decided the Mexican wolf’s genetic plight is worsening.

Please join us in howling across the miles to support these voices for wolves as they raise awareness for lobos that remain at the brink of extinction.

Monday, February 6, 2017

Wisconsin DNR underreports gray wolf poaching says new study


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For years, wolves have been shot illegally, struck by cars and trucks or legally killed by authorities acting on reports that wolves were killing and threatening livestock and pets.

But in a study published Monday in the Journal of Mammalogy, UW researcher Adrian Treves and a group of scientists found higher levels of illegal killing of wolves in Wisconsin than reported by the Department of Natural Resources.
In the paper, the researchers say that failing to accurately account for wolf deaths, especially in future hunting and trapping seasons, is “risky.” Also, if officials continue to underreport poaching, it “will risk unsustainable mortality and raise the probability of a population crash,” they write.

“My argument is that scientifically you have to put your best foot forward,” said Treves, founder of the Carnivore Coexistence Lab at UW-Madison. “And when the DNR didn’t, they were doing it with an illegal activity (poaching).”

Learn more.

Sunday, February 5, 2017

M.V.P. Most Valuable Predator


Beyond being ecologically important as a critical keystone predator, Atka is the cutest QB there will ever be.

Friday, February 3, 2017

Make Big Things Happen


Every voice raised in support of wildlife and wild places can make a difference. And when we all howl together we can make big things happen.

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Endangered Red Wolves Make Valuable Contribution to Genetic Health of the Species

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Red wolf yearling M2116 coming out of anesthesia (Thank you, kiddo!)
Today 5 critically endangered red wolves made very personal and valuable contributions to the genetic health of their rare species. Under the leadership of reproductive specialists Cheri Asa, Karen Bauman from the Saint Louis Zoo, and Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine's Soon Hon Cheong, Wolf Conservation Center staff and volunteers collected the wolves’ semen for potential future use.

Via gamete cryopreservation, the samples will remain “on ice” in a “frozen zoo" - the term of endearment used by scientists for the bank of wolf sperm and ovaries stored in cryogenic vaults where some of the most precious genes are being held for future reproductive use.


Although the "frozen zoo" is an effective (and fascinating) tool to preserve rare wolf genes, other recovery strategies need to occur immediately to rescue the wild red wolf population from the brink of extinction. Only 45 red wolves remain.

Please consider urging USFWS, the very agency charged by federal law with protecting endangered species, to recommit to red wolf recovery in the wild. Before it is too late... --

Take action here.

War on Wolves Act Threatens Wolves and the Endangered Species Act

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Not only is the War on Wolves Act (H.R. 424 and S.164) poised to strip federal protection for wolves in four states to allow trophy hunting/trapping to resume, it also undermines the integrity of our nation’s most significant environmental law - the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

The ESA requires the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to base all listing and delisting decisions on the best available science. Thus, when determining whether to end endangered species protection, federal law requires that an independent panel of scientists provide an objective scientific review of the federal agency's proposals. The War on Wolves Act blatantly ignores this federal mandate and stands to weaken the ESA itself.

Science has concluded that we have entered an unprecedented period of climate change and human-caused Sixth Mass extinction. As conservationists in the 21st century, we face the growing challenge of helping imperiled species heal and flourish and supporting biodiversity for future generations, not dismantling the cornerstone of our nation’s conservation law.

If we destroy the ESA, we are killing more than a law. We are killing endangered species. And no species should have to face extinction at the hands of humanity, much less twice.

URGENT - Please urge your representatives to oppose these congressional attempts to delist wolves and further weaken the ESA. Take action here.