Thursday, March 29, 2018

Mexican Gray Wolf - The Wild Reborn




Twenty years ago today, 11 captive-reared Mexican gray wolves were released to the wild for the first time in Arizona and New Mexico. Missing from the landscape for more than 30 years, the howl of the rarest and most unique subspecies of gray wolf was once again greeted by the mountains of the southwest.

The Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) or “lobo” is the most genetically distinct lineage of wolves in the Western Hemisphere, and one of the most endangered mammals in North America. By the mid-1980s, hunting, trapping, and poisoning caused the extinction of lobos in the wild, with only a handful remaining in captivity. Twenty years ago this month, 11 captive bred lobos were reintroduced into the wild as part of a federal reintroduction program under the Endangered Species Act. Today in the U.S., there is a single wild population comprising only 114 individuals – an increase of just one from 113 counted at the end of 2016.

For almost two decades, the Wolf Conservation Center has played a critical role in preserving and protecting these imperiled predators through carefully managed breeding, research, and reintroduction. To date, the WCC remains one of the three largest holding facilities for Mexican gray wolves and three wolves from the Center have been released to their ancestral homes in the wild. Furthermore, this season promises to be an especially exciting one with three potential Mexican wolf pup litters this April or May! Beyond being adorable, these pups will represent the WCC’s active participation to save species on the brink of extinction.

We hope you enjoy the Wolf Conservation Center's story of the Mexican Wolf as we carry out the work of their recovery.

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

12-Yr-Old Artist Designs Official 2018 LoboWeek Logo

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It's #LoboWeek!

A week to celebrate the 20th anniversary the Mexican gray wolf's return to the wild!

Meet the artist behind the official 2018 LoboWeek logo - Vivian Ostrander!

When Vivian was born, 42 Mexican gray wolves lived in the wild. And during her lifetime, lobos have never known extinction!

Let's keep it that way!

Learn more about #LoboWeek here!

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Double your Donation for the Lobo -Today Only!

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Twenty years this month, 11 captive-reared Mexican gray wolves were released to the wild for the first time in Arizona and New Mexico. Missing from the landscape for more than 30 years, the howl of the rarest and most unique subspecies of gray wolf was once again greeted by the mountains of the southwest.


In honor of this wild holiday, WCC supporters have generously provided a matching grant up to $20,000 for all donations received TODAY, March 27th, to help support our efforts to protect and preserve critically endangered Mexican gray wolves!

Mexican gray wolves need our help. No species should have to face extinction at the hands of humanity, much less twice.

The Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) or “Lobo” is the most genetically distinct lineage of wolves in the Western Hemisphere, and one of the most endangered mammals in North America. By the mid-1980s, hunting, trapping, and poisoning caused the extinction of Lobos in the wild, with only a handful remaining in captivity. Twenty years ago this month, 11 captive-bred Lobos were reintroduced into the wild as part of a federal reintroduction program under the Endangered Species Act.

Today in the U.S., there is a single wild population comprising only 114 individuals – an increase of just one from 113 counted at the end of 2016.

For almost two decades, the Wolf Conservation Center has played a critical role in preserving and protecting these imperiled predators through carefully managed breeding, research, and reintroduction. To date, the WCC remains one of the three largest holding facilities for Mexican gray wolves and three wolves from the Center have been released to their ancestral homes in the wild. Furthermore, this season promises to be an especially exciting one with three potential Mexican wolf pup litters this April or May! Beyond being adorable, these pups will represent the WCC’s active participation to save species on the brink of extinction.

Sunday, March 25, 2018

10-Year-Old Wolf Advocate Names Endangered Mexican Wolf Pup After Author Carl Hiaasen

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Meet Mexican gray wolf pup Carl!

The great folks at Mexicanwolves.org posted the results of their Sixth Annual Mexican Wolf Pup Naming Contest and thanks to the 105 children who entered, 18 wild Mexican gray wolf pups now have names!

The contest judges had a very difficult task. Entries were ranked based on a combination of the pup name, the art or essay, and the reason given for the name. It was evident that a great deal of thought, creativity and passion went into the entries they received. "These young people and their teachers and parents give us hope for the future of Mexican gray wolves."

Special congrats to Wolf Conservation Center supporter Eleanor Wilhelm for her winning entry. Inspired by author Carl Hiaasen who writes books about children working to save endangered animals, the fifth grader named Mexican gray wolf pup m1680 Carl!

Enjoy discovering all the creative entries here.

Happy #LoboWeek!

Saturday, March 24, 2018

Lights Out Around the World to Call on the Importance of Addressing Climate Change

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Starting as a symbolic lights-out event in Sydney in 2007, Earth Hour is now the world's largest grassroots movement for the environment, inspiring millions of people to take action for our planet and nature.

Join the movement.

TODAY - March 24, 2018, 8:30pm, wherever you are in the world.

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

"War on Wolves" Rider Dropped from Omnibus Bill

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Policy riders that would have eliminated Endangered Species Act protections for gray wolves in 4 states were dropped from the omnibus bill!

YOU DID IT!

Congress heard your howls! Thanks to you, the 2018 spending bill is moving forward devoid of the “war on Wolves” rider seeking to eliminate Endangered Species Act protections for gray wolves in 4 states!
Every voice raised in support of wildlife and wild places can make a difference. And when we all work together we can make big things happen! None of this would have been possible without your calls, emails and the leaders in Congress who #standforwolves.

Details to come.

Saturday, March 17, 2018

NPS May Soon Restore Wolves to Isle Royale

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Friday, the National Park Service (NPS) tentatively decided to transport 20-30 gray wolves to Isle Royale in Michigan over the next three years to replenish a population that has nearly died out because of inbreeding and disease.

Currently, the Lake Superior island remains home to just two wolves.

But a strong wolf pack is needed to keep Isle Royale's growing moose population under control. With a pair left to feast on them, the moose are undergoing a population explosion that could endanger the wilderness area's fir trees and eventually cause many of the moose to starve.

The NPS will make a final decision in 30 days, after the public has had an opportunity to review a new environmental statement that endorses the restoration plan.

Friday, March 16, 2018

How Selena Gomez Unknowingly "Handled" to Help Wolves

When Puma chose Selena Gomez instead of Richard Handler for their new campaign...something had to be done.

Enormous howls of thanks to Wolf Conservation Center supporter Richard Handler for taking one for the PACK!

New Study Provides Assessment of Future Large Carnivore Reintroduction Sites

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In a "rewilding" movement cheered by some but decried by others, wolves have recolonized portions of their former range in the United States.

Red wolf (Canis rufus)reintroduction was among the first instances of a species, considered extinct in the wild, being re-established from a captive population. In many ways the red wolf program was the pilot program, serving as a model for subsequent canid reintroductions, particularly those of the Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) to the American Southwest and the gray wolf (Canis lupus) to the Yellowstone region.

But what opportunities do we have to expand the rewilding effort?

A new study published Wednesday in Royal Society Open Science is the first to provide a spatially explicit global assessment of future large carnivore rewilding possibilities.

The paper mentions just two specific sites where further wolf reintroductions might work. They suggest it could be possible to put gray wolves in Olympic National Park in Washington and restore critically endangered red wolves into Everglades National Park. These places have space for reproduction and development, prey and humans who may tolerate them.

More: ‘Rewilding’ Missing Carnivores May Help Restore Some Landscapes via The New York Times

Thursday, March 15, 2018

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Happy Birthday, Kai!

The self-appointed Sheriff of the Wolf Conservation Center's "Staff Pack" turns 12 years old today! The 90lb German Shepherd is more than a pretty face; as a wolf pup nanny, Kai held a critical role in socializing WCC Ambassador wolves Alawa, Zephyr, and Nikai (pictured) during their puppy-hood.

As Ambassadors, they help open the door to understanding wolves by forging a connection between the public and their wild kin. So developing a basic comfort level around people is vital to their becoming educational ambassadors and leading happy and healthy lives at the WCC. By providing canine companionship, Kai bridged the gap between the human and canine world and helped the wolves become the powerful players we know and love in the fight to preserve wolves’ rightful place in the environment.

Thank you, Kai! We love you and HAPPY BIRTHDAY!!!

Monday, March 12, 2018

For Wolves, Playtime Strengthens Family Bonds



Wolves are highly social animals that live in well-organized family units called packs. Cooperative living gives wolf families a number of benefits. It facilitates successful hunting, pup-rearing, defending pack territory, and more.

The parents (sometimes referred to as the “alpha” pair) are the leaders of the pack and they express their status with erect posture and tails carried high. The less dominant family members exhibit their position through submissive behavior. With lowered tails and posture, less dominant wolves acknowledge their role and rank in the family hierarchy. Pawing, tail tucking, and muzzle-licking are among the submissive gestures expressed by less dominant wolves. Although hungry wolf pups hoping to elicit regurgitation in adults employ these behaviors, they’re expressed by adults to function as a sign of affection and reaffirmation of their social status.

When seeking to play, wolves will dance and bow playfully. Playtime can also include a game of chase, jaw sparring, and varied vocalizations.

For wolves, playtime isn’t only fun, it strengthens family bonds and reaffirms social status within the pack.

Learn more about wolf communication here.

Sunday, March 11, 2018

Howls of Thanks from the Wolf Conservation Center

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We asked for your help and you heard our howls!

Thanks to you, we are making good progress recovering from damage brought on by last week’s powerful nor’easter!

We are humbled by the incredible support from our pack - supporters like you.

Howls of thanks from all of the wolves and all of us here at the WCC!

Saturday, March 10, 2018

Wyoming Proposes Hunting Grizzlies for Trophy



Eight months ago, Yellowstone's grizzly bears were a federally protected endangered species.

Now, less than a year after U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service removed protection for the iconic bears, Wyoming has proposed hunting them for trophy.

The first Wyoming grizzly bear trophy hunt in over four decades will begin in the fall and target 24 bears if commissioners who oversee the state’s wildlife sign off on the proposal.

In the meantime, the agency is inviting the public to weigh in on the draft regulations. Comments are due by April 30.

More.

Remembering Ambassador Wolf Apache

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Today we remember an old friend.

Eight years ago today, Ambassador Wolf Apache passed away at the age of 12. Although his powerful essence was hard to define, people understood it when they saw him. Apache was a head turner. When he howled, everyone listened. When he led, everyone followed. When he left, everything changed.

Apache touched all who were lucky enough to hear his howl.
R.I.P. Apache. We miss you.

Friday, March 9, 2018

Wolf Conservation Center Slammed by Nor'easter

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Wolf Conservation Center staff, volunteers, and wolves are sharing a collective sigh of relief today.

Wednesday's big, blustery nor'easter, the second to hit New York's Westchester County in less than a week, brought well over a foot of wet, heavy snow and significant fence damage to the WCC.

Thankfully, the wolves are okay.

WCC's endangered species facility, which houses the majority of the Center's critically endangered Mexican gray wolves and red wolves, bared the brunt of the formidable storm. Although a number of enclosures were damaged, the wolves remained safe and contained.

WCC staff has been working tirelessly to remove debris, address the compromised fence-lines. and make the pathways and roads accessible. However, many repairs remain to be done. If you are able, please consider making a donation to help us in this effort. Every penny helps!

Donate here.

Some good news -- since our restricted area was impacted the most, all education programming remains on schedule!

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Nobody Does a Nor'easter as Beautifully as Wolves


Tuesday, March 6, 2018

Hunting wolves for trophy? What you can do for wolves right now.

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URGENT -- Facing another appropriations deadline on March 23, Congress is still working to determine how to fund the government. Unfortunately, damaging anti-wolf riders that undermine Endangered Species Act protections for wolves are still in play.

One provision seeks to permanently remove federal ESA protections for gray wolves in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Wyoming, to allow trophy hunting to resume. To add insult to injury, the bill prohibits its judicial review thus preventing any legal challenge.

If these riders are not removed by Congress, wolves will die at the hands of trophy hunters.

TAKE ACTION HERE.

And/or please call 888-813-5246 TODAY to urge your reps to #StopExtinction!

Saturday, March 3, 2018

Nor'easter Update From the Wolf Conservation Center

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Nor'easter Update

High nor'easter winds caused flooding, hundreds of downed trees, and thousands of power outages all over the northeast. More than 60,000 homes are without power just in our neck of the woods here in Westchester County, NY! Thankfully, all the wolves are doing fine, and thanks to the Jeniam Foundation's generous grant to support the Wolf Conservation Center's purchase of a powerful generator, the WCC remains up and running!

The generator is definitely 'Nikai-approved'... All the wolves are thankful that the walk-in freezer will always remain operational so their roadkill deer never spoils. Yummy.

Friday, March 2, 2018

How Do Wolves Act During a Nor'easter?



A major nor'easter is pounding our area. Some Mexican gray wolves are playing, others have opted for a snooze. Join the lobos now via LIVE webcams: https://nywolf.org/webcams

PS: All the wolves have access to dens, but after some unusually mild weather, the snow is welcome to wolves!

Thursday, March 1, 2018

Happiness is having dogs (and wolves!) in the office

The Dog Files - Ep.0008 - The Wolf Files from GP Creative on Vimeo.

It's throwback Thursday!

Enjoy this video from 2009 when the Dog Files introduce some of the Wolf Conservation Center's original lesser-known canines: the "Staff Pack" - a handful of dogs that make life a little more interesting for original ambassador wolves Kaila, Apache, Lukas and Atka.